1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

Shows that changed over the seasons.

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Mysto, Feb 18, 2018.

  1. TJPC

    TJPC Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2016
    Messages:
    2,193
    Likes Received:
    1,895
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Hamilton Ontario
    Real Name:
    Terry Carroll
    In Star Trek Voyager, they start out with a rather boring character called Kess. She is eventually “replaced” by 7 of 9 who is every male-mother’s-basement-dwelling fan’s delight.

    Oh wait, I forgot to mention Kate Mulgrew’s hair!
     
    Jeff Flugel, B-ROLL and Stan like this.
  2. mattCR

    mattCR Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2005
    Messages:
    10,789
    Likes Received:
    576
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Lee Summit, Missouri
    Real Name:
    Matt
    Angel- first four seasons, small private detective agency fighting evil like Wolfram & Hart. Season 5: they take over Wolfram and Hart :) BTW, some either love or hated this move, but it played out very well I thought.

    Quantum Leap went from fixing very small moments in people's lives to a final season of them leaping into major historical moments.
     
    Jeff Flugel likes this.
  3. Hanson

    Hanson Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    5,034
    Likes Received:
    424
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Hanson
    Similarly, Good Times was supposed to be an All in the Family spin off about Florida Evans' family, including the husband. But it quickly became the Jimmie Walker show, and John Amos quit as a result. The mom on Family Matters also quit the show because of the change in direction.
     
    MatthewA and Brian Kidd like this.
  4. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Messages:
    15,518
    Likes Received:
    2,775
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    Not really. Jo Marie Payton did not leave the show until the last half of the final season. So she made nearly 200 episodes alongside Steve Urkel.
     
    Brian Kidd likes this.
  5. Stan

    Stan Producer

    Joined:
    May 18, 1999
    Messages:
    5,177
    Likes Received:
    953
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    I think I was 12. Oddly not allowed to watch it. We were also banned from Laugh-In, Love American Style, Dark Shadows and believe it or not, Star Trek repeats (my little sister was scared by an episode, had that really tall bald alien, he had some wires or something coming out of his hand). The goofy things parents do to "protect" us.

    Yet a few years later I'm seeing "Carrie", then "Alien".:rolleyes:
     
  6. Blimpoy06

    Blimpoy06 Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    1,989
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Real Name:
    Darin
    Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley are the ones that come to mind. So many cast and tone changes on Happy Days. Ritchie and Potsie were the focus in season 1. Then The Fonz became a breakout character. The show went from single to multi camera in season 3. Multiple actors playing older brother Chuck early on, then he is never mentioned again. The lead actor leaves after 7 years and the show goes on for many more.

    Both Laverne & Shirley start out as somewhat promiscuous early on. Then Shirley turns into Doris Day. They move the show from the Midwest to California. Shirley is not even in the last season.
     
    Tony Bensley likes this.
  7. Jack P

    Jack P Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    4,324
    Likes Received:
    2,004
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    The Odd Couple changes in Season 2 noticably. Instead of a single camera show with a laugh track it became a three-camera show in front of an audience. Also, the influence of the movie and play was diminished with (1) the elimination of the Pigeon sisters (2) the downplaying of the poker players (3) Felix in Season 1 was more of a "swinger" who wasn't really pining too much for his ex-wife (4) the intrusion of more of the personality quirks of Randall (opera) and Klugman (horse race betting).
     
    Blimpoy06 likes this.
  8. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    2,373
    Likes Received:
    2,191
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    Ben Masters
    To me, being that Shirley wasn't even in the final go (1982-83), the title should have been edited to reflect that, instead of keeping the full title as an artifact title.
     
  9. RBailey

    RBailey Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    444
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    John Hall
    Welcome Back, Kotter is another one. Gabe Kaplan totally disappeared from the show due to contract problems with the producers.
     
    skylark68 likes this.
  10. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    7,876
    Likes Received:
    1,615
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Salinas, CA
    Real Name:
    Matthew
    The first and last episodes of Gimme A Break! have nothing in common except the name of the show and Nell Carter.

    And John Travolta's movie career, including but not limited to following up the twin triumphs of Saturday Night Fever and Grease with the godawful Moment by Moment, took him away from it as well.
     
  11. Jack P

    Jack P Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    4,324
    Likes Received:
    2,004
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Actually Travolta wasn't as much away from the show that last year as Kaplan was (though he's not in every episode). To his credit he did fulfill his contract despite the fact he was now a big movie star at that point.
     
    MatthewA likes this.
  12. Stan

    Stan Producer

    Joined:
    May 18, 1999
    Messages:
    5,177
    Likes Received:
    953
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Wow, another oldie. Loved the early years of Laverne & Shirley, but when they switched to California and losing Shirley that final year, really messed it up. Especially bringing in that blond bimbo, downhill from there.

    Happy Days, I kind of passed on that one. Found the Fonzie character really annoying. Don't even remember the "shark" moment, have only seen it in clips. I must have given up on it by that time. Joanie and Marion were by far the best characters on the show. Could have chosen any generic actors to play Richie and his pals.
     
  13. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    7,876
    Likes Received:
    1,615
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Salinas, CA
    Real Name:
    Matthew
    Whenever I hear those children we never see anywhere else chant "One-two-three-four-five-six-seven-eight-schlemiel-schlamazel-Hassenfeffer Incorporated", I know I'm in for some really depressing viewing. Even the prior California years with Shirley still actually in it had some redeeming characteristics.
     
  14. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    4,240
    Likes Received:
    4,110
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    My wife and I love Chef! Then came the major S3 changes as you've indicated. FWIW, that 3rd season was produced 2 years after the last episode of S2 aired. I believe the same guy wrote most of the episodes but I've never checked the credits to know for sure. And I agree, it's not as good as S1/S2.
    I'm the odd-ball here. I liked Kess far more than Seven of Nine. The way she was written out of the show was horrible. I read Mulgrew's hair was done so many ways because she refused to do the "babe" bit. Here refusal was also a driving force behind the creation of Seven of Nine.
     
    Jeff Flugel likes this.
  15. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    7,876
    Likes Received:
    1,615
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Salinas, CA
    Real Name:
    Matthew
    I quit watching Family Matters after Telma Hopkins left for a show with Cindy Williams. Out of all of Lorimar's family sitcoms, Valerie wins the prize for the greatest number of changes and the most public acrimony over the way they handled them.
     
    B-ROLL likes this.
  16. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    4,240
    Likes Received:
    4,110
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    Mission Impossible changed a bit after season 1 but even more so after S5 when they practically elimCinated foreign missions with a cold war flavor in favor of US based ones mostly dealing with organized crime.

    The Adventures of Superman changed from a more serious, film noir, style to stories with a SF flavor beginning in S2. That was in full swing, and far less serious in nature, by the time they switched to color for S3.

    The Doris Day Show changed from her being a widow with 2 children who gradually cultivated a career at a magazine during S1-S3 (and each of those seasons was rather different) to her character suddenly becoming a swinging single career woman in S4. The rest of the cast was gone, including her sons.

    I Love Lucy - Ricky got a movie job so they lived in a Hollywood hotel during S4. They moved back to New York in S5. Then changed the name and format when moving to a Connecticut farm in S6.

    It's About Time - changed midway through its only season from a story about astronauts flung back to the stone age to the stone age people going with the astronauts to modern times.

    Mannix - S1 he worked for Interact, a firm who used computers to aid crime solving. In S2 Interact, and the computers, were gone and it became a fairly conventional private detective show.

    Bob - Bob Newhart's "3rd" series (actually the 4th if you count his variety show, "The Bob Newhart Show," in the 60s). He was a comic book artist in S1. S2 saw the comic getting shut down and he became a greeting card writer. It had an almost entire cast change.

    Wonder Woman S1 was her in WWII fighting Nazis. In S2 she was now in modern times.

    The Jeff Foxworthy Show was a "family" show with him working HVAC in the midwest. New family, except for the son, new location, new job, and new network for S2. Totally different show.

    Coach - had Coach Fox leave MSU for a pro team in S8. Horrible move.

    Hearts Afire (John Ritter and Markie Post) changed the setting and most of the cast from S1 to S2.

    Sledge Hammer! ended S1 by blowing everything up in a nuclear blast. Due to the unexpected renewal, S2 was set 5 years before the events in S1.
     
  17. Blimpoy06

    Blimpoy06 Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    1,989
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Real Name:
    Darin
    Jeff Flugel and B-ROLL like this.
  18. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Messages:
    15,518
    Likes Received:
    2,775
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    Valerie starring Valerie Harper as a career women trying to raise three boys while her husband, an airline pilot, was often away. Harper left the show after the second season after a contract dispute and her character was killed off. The show was renamed Valerie's Family and Sandy Duncan was cast as the boys' aunt who moves in to help raise them. The husband/father spent more time at home and the neighbor played by Edie McClurg became a regular. The show ran for a total of six seasons and later seasons were further retitled as The Hogans and The Hogan Family to completely remove Harper's name from the show.
     
    skylark68 likes this.
  19. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    7,876
    Likes Received:
    1,615
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Salinas, CA
    Real Name:
    Matthew
    From the beginning of The Facts of Life to its conclusion nine years later, the only things and people that stayed all the way through were Blair, Tootie, and Natalie, and the town of Peekskill, NY. Even the production company changed its name and owner before being folded into a movie studio after having itself acquired one.* And that's partly why the reunion was produced by a company one of the cast members worked for first, one that narrowly avoided a buyout around the same time.

    Around the same time, Small Wonder replaced McClurg with Alice Ghostley as the Brindles' Aunt, Ida Mae**, on weeks when she wasn't also playing Bernice Clifton on Designing Women. Per the former show's DVD commentary, it was all about money. Between Lorimar and NBC, they could afford Edie's comparatively modest demands, but not Valerie's. First-run syndication was another matter altogether.

    *Leave it to Norman Lear to buy the one studio in Hollywood with a part of the human anatomy in its name, one synonymous with the 1983 Best Foreign-Language Film Oscar Winner.
    **Had one of the writers seen Female Trouble?
     
  20. Nick*Z

    Nick*Z Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2003
    Messages:
    796
    Likes Received:
    1,072
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Location:
    Canada
    Real Name:
    NICK
    Virtually any show that sticks around for say more than 4 seasons has shake-ups in the cast. The night-time soaps (Dallas, Dynasty, Falcon Crest were notorious for this) as, in more recent times, Law & Order. How well the public gravitates to these cast changes dictates the longevity of every show...partly. Think, The X-Files. After David Duchovney left the franchise the series and the ratings tanked. The difficulty I have with acceptance is when a show veers wildly into narrative territory it really did not start out to cover, but believes it can explore.

    Again, the night-time soaps were brutally bad at this; writing in major characters and plot twists, only to completely wipe them off the face of the planet after the season cliffhangers had been shored up. In my opinion, it's the open-endedness that eventually does a series in; when there are too many plot points left unattended (Falcon Crest: the secret society who murdered supporting player Ursula Andress and left her lying with a bullet hole in her head next to one of the unconscious series regulars was quietly allowed to linger for another season of minor intrigues before just fading into the backdrop and never addressed again), merely dropped (after given the big build-up: Downton Abbey - nobody explained who killed the first Mrs. Bates after spending an entire season on the mystery) or carried to their absurd extreme (Dynasty: a distraught Fallon gets sucked up by a space ship), then, a series is really in trouble.

    It's also a problem when the writers get stale and think the only way to keep a beloved series alive is by creating a seismic shift in cast and/or location. Murder She Wrote did it with the most finesse, eventually easing Angela Lansbury's grandmotherly sleuth away from her Maine hamlet of Cabot Cove into more cosmopolitan venues where more murders occurred. Let's be real: if she had stayed in Cabot Cove it would have eventually reached the population base of zero.

    But Gimmee a Break committed both sins: moving the series from California to New York, ditching virtually all of the original cast except for Nell Carter, and completely rewriting her role as the custodian of two blonde moppets (played by Joey Lawrence and his brother). Laverne & Shirley made the idiotic decision to move from Milwaukee to L.A. and then trudge on with only Laverne, thanks to a contractual dispute with Cindy Williams.

    Good Times killed off its patriarch, James Evans and then wrote his wife out of the franchise too, basically leaving the series to its three adult 'kids'. Alley McBeal took the character of Billy - basically a good guy (and the lynch pin in the whole pivotal lover's triangle subplot involving Alley, Billy and his wife, Georgia that literally carried the series for four seasons) - turned him into a pompous ass, then explained it all away as a brain tumor that eventually killed the character off camera.

    Finally, there are the 'poop poor' excuses for a series cancellation: Remington Steele, a prime example, axed in mid-season because NBC exec's wanted to teach its runaway star, Pierce Brosnon a lesson: that he couldn't do James Bond and their show simultaneously - retaining the rights to his contract so he basically could not work in anything more or better than a series of Bond-esque diet Coke commercials.

    Dynasty
    was axed without giving the producers a chance to bottle up all of the loose ends in a season cliffhanger that left virtually all of its principle cast in peril. Two years later, the executive brain trust responsible for this decision - that rightfully outraged fans of this series - elected to bring back only a portion of the principles, virtually ignore the previous season cliffhanger, and launch into an amnesia-styled reboot that made virtually no sense and betrayed the following of that show even further.

    A show is perfect when it recognizes it's time to leave: when the writers have said it all, the characters have played it all, and the audiences acknowledges that to continue on would simply betray their glowing memories of what they first loved about the series. Shows that fall into this category include Cheers, Fraiser, St. Elsewhere and Friends. But nobody in the history of TV has done it better than Mary Tyler-Moore: group hug, everyone. Group hug. And tears. And oh...when is that coming back in syndication?
     
    Jeff Flugel and B-ROLL like this.

Share This Page